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North 

Carolina 

TOBACCO 

REPORT 

1971 ■ 1972 






THE BULLETIN 

of the 

North Carolina 

Department of Agriculture 



JAMES A. GRAHAM 

Commissioner 

Number 207 
May 1972 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Tobacco Moth Posing New Problem m Flue-Cured Market 5 

Scheduling — Key to Market Improvements 8 

Tobacco Industry Shows Strength 10 

State Market Summary 1971-72 12 

North Carolina Tobacco Warehouse Sales Report 

for Season 1971-72 16 

Summary of N, C. Dealer and Warehouse Resales — 1971 18 

Producer and Gross Sales of Flue-Cured Tobacco 

by States— 1971 18 

Flue-Cured Movement In and Out of North Carolina 19 

Burley Tobacco Movement In and Out of North Carolina 19 

Flue-Cured Stabilization Receipts by Types and States — 1971 . . . 20 

Burley Stabilization Receipts for N. C. and Total 

U. S. — 1971-72 20 

N. C. Burley Tobacco Allotments — 1972 21 

N. C. Flue-Cured Tobacco Allotments — 1972 22 

North Carolina Burley Crops 1928-1971 24 

North Carolina Flue-Cured Crops 1919-1971 25 

North Carolina Tobacco Warehouses and Operators 

by Belts and Markets — 1971 26 

State Board of Agriculture 31 

Domestic Tax Paid Cigarette Consumption 

by Kinds — 1971 Back Cover 



For free distribution by the Tobacco Section, 

Division of Markets, North Carolina Department 

of Agriculture, Raleigh, N. C. 

Curtis F. Tarleton, Director, Division of Markets 

J. H. Cyrus, In Charge, Tobacco Marketing Section 

J. T. Bunn, Tobacco Marketing Specialist 



Forewoyd 




James A. Graham 



The twenty-third annual issue of the 
North Carolina Tobacco Report was com- 
piled and assembled by J. H. Cyrus, in 
charge of the Tobacco Marketing Section, 
and J. T. Bunn, Marketing Specialist, Divi- 
sion of Markets, North Carolina Depart- 
ment of Agriculture. 

Mr. Cyrus has recently been named to 
Who's Who In America in recognition of 
his outstanding contributions to all seg- 
ments of the tobacco industry. One of his 
contributions was that of originating and 
publishing the North Carolina Tobacco 
Report which is recognized internationally 
for its wealth of information relative to the 
current tobacco market situation and problems along with official 
market statistics and other data which is of interest throughout the 
tobacco industry. 

Recognition is given several State and Federal agencies for their 
cooperation in making some of the data and information found in 
this publication available. For their contribution, credit is due the 
Cooperative Crop Reporting Service, the Agricultural Stabilization 
Conservation Service, the Flue-Cured Tobacco Cooperative Stabiliza- 
tion Corporation and the Tobacco Division, Consumer and Marketing 
Service, U. S. Department of Agriculture. 

Special recognition is given Albert H. Graves, Industrial Engineer, 
USDA, ARS, TFRD, for his market research work which has con- 
tributed greatly toward improving efficiency and economy in the 
operation of the flue-cured auction system. The cover pictures depict 
three of his major areas of research — scheduling, receiving con- 
veyors and the system of breaking floor after sale (see story inside). 






/97^/7V 




Commissioner of Agriculture 



Who's Who In America 

John Holman Cyrus, head of the To- 
bacco Marketing Section, North Carolina 
^^1^^ Department of Agriculture, has been rec- 

J^^^^^ ognized by the editors of Who's Who In 

fc ■ America for his outstanding accomplish- 

H" I ments and contributions to all segments 

'^ ' ; of the tobacco industry. 

l|^^j^^^ Mr. Cyrus' name and biographical 

^^^^B ^P^ ^^^^^ sketch are scheduled for inclusion in Vol- 

^^^H^&^^^^^^l ume 13 of Who's Who In America in the 

^^^^^^a^^^^^H South and Southwest region. This a 

^^^^^^^^^^^^^1 recognition given only six people 

^^Hi^H^^^^^^H every ten thousand. 

John H. Cyrus Included in his contributions is that of 

originating the North Carolina Tobacco Re- 
port which has been published annually during the last 23 years. 
This publication is recognized internationally for its wealth of infor- 
mation relative to the current tobacco market situation, along with 
official market statistics and other data of interest to growers, ware- 
housemen, buying companies, teachers, researchers and others with 
a tobacco interest. The North Carolina Tobacco Report is catalogued 
as a reference book in many libraries throughout the United States 
and in several foreign countries. 

Mr. Cyrus also developed one of the first Federal-State service 
programs established in any State Department of Agriculture for the 
purpose of improving marketing. All segments of the tobacco indus- 
try — farmers, warehousemen and buying companies — have received 
benefits from this program. 

Mr. Cyrus is currently serving on several important national 
boards related to the tobacco industry. These include the Board of 
Directors and Executive Committee of the National Tobacco Tax 
Council; the Board of Directors of the National Tobacco Growers' 
Information Committee, an'd the Board of Directors of the National 
Tobacco and Cotton Museum. He is also an advisor to the Industry- 
wide Flue-Cured Marketing Committee. 



Tobacco Moth Posing New Problem 
In Flue-Cured Market 

By J. H. Cyrus 

The tremendous increase in the infestation of new crop flue-cured 
tobacco with worms (larvae) of the tobacco moth during the 1971 
marketing season caused alarm throughout the tobacco industry. 
Many tobacco growers, to their surprise, found last season that their 
new crop of cured leaf had become infested in the packhouse by the 
tobacco moth, thus causing considerable economic loss to them. 
Also, all major tobacco buying companies and processors expressed 
grave concern because of the magnitude of this problem since the 
processing of tobacco into strips does not kill all of the infestation 
as it is prepared for storage. 

Source of Infestation 

The widespread outbreaks of the tobacco moth on farms last 
season can be attributed to two major sources. (1) The infestation 
of burlap sheets in which flue-cured tobacco is marketed, and (2) 
infestation of farms by adjacent farms where growers follow poor 
sanitation practices in cleaning packhouses at the end of the season, 
especially where tobacco is carried over from one year to the next. 

The burlap sheets, which are intermingled from farms to process- 
ing plants and back to the farms again throughout the flue-cured 
tobacco growing states, become infested with the eggs and larvae of 
the tobacco moth and, in some instances, the cigarette beetle. When 
these sheets are carried back to the farm and thrown into the pack- 
house at the end of the marketing season, the stage is set for the 
beginning of an infestation in the packhouse. Of course, all sheets 
probably are not infested with eggs and larvae, but it only takes one 
infested sheet in the bundle or in a storage room or packhouse to 
start an outbreak. 

Tobacco Moth Life Cycle 

In order to better establish practices of control for the tobacco 
moth, growers should become familiar with this pest and its habits. 

The adult tobacco moth is brownish-gray and measures about % 
inch from head to tip of folded wings. Their eggs with tough shells 
are laid singly or in loose groups on tobacco or in tobacco scrap 
and dust that have accumulated in corners, cracks, crevices and on 
ledges, or in burlap sheets that have been stored in the packhouse, 
or in warehouse and company storage rooms. 

The average female moth lays more than 100 eggs, which hatch 
in 3 to 17 days. The larvae reach maturity in 25 to 128 days de- 
pending on the season of year. The larvae is a pinkish-white worm 
that grows to a length of about V2 inch at maturity. 



The tobacco moth overwinters in the larvae stage. In the fall, most 
mature larvae migrate to the surface of stored tobacco and burlap 
sheets, or to cracks and crevices in the packhouse where they spin 
loose cocoons of silk in which to hibernate. In hibernation, larvae 
can survive even lower temperatures than those experienced through- 
out the flue-cured production area. 

The adult moths begin emerging in the spring from March in the 
southern areas to the middle of May in the northern areas of the 
flue-cured states. Under summer conditions the life cycle of the 
moth from egg to adult is about 50 days. (See life cycle of tobacco 
moth as shown.) 

Only the larvae (worm) of the tobacco moth feeds on cured to- 
bacco. They feed only on the leaf of flue-cured and Turkish types 
of tobacco, and they prefer the better grades — those high in sugar 
and low in nicotine. 




Stages of the tobacco moth: (A) Large larva; (B) Pupa; (C) Adult; (D) Eggs 
and young larva on section of tobacco leaf. 



Prevention and Control 

Sanitation is the key to prevention of an infestation of tobacco 
moths or cigarette beetles on the farm. Once an infestation of cured 
leaf tobacco has developed in a farm packhouse, the simplest re- 
course is to sort out the infested portion and burn it to destroy 
the larvae, and then market the unaffected tobacco as quickly as 
possible. 

The widespread increase in infestation of new crop cured tobacco 
with the tobacco moth during the 1971 marketing season is indi- 



cative of serious problems ahead unless appropriate steps are taken 
to nip it in the bud. 

First of all, since it appears that a major source of infestation 
of the tobacco moth is through the intermingling of burlap sheets 
throughout the tobacco industry from farm to processor and back 
to the farm again, this should be the first line of attack on the moth 
problem. This attack is going to require a coordinated program in- 
volving all phases of the tobacco industry including purchasers and 
processors, warehouse operators and tobacco growers. 

The following steps are suggested as means of preventing the 
spread and in controlling the tobacco moth and cigarette beetle: 

1. All buying companies and processors should fumigate all bur- 
lap sheets on hand during the spring or early summer prior to 
the beginning of the marketing season so that any sheets return- 
ed to warehouses will not be infested with moth eggs and larvae. 

2. All warehouse operators should have all burlap sheets on hand 
fumigated or effectively treated by a professional pest control 
company prior to the opening of the marketing season so that no 
infested sheets will be passed on to the farmer. 

3. Also, farmers' burlap sheets on hand at the end of the market- 
ing season should be treated, preferably by fumigation, to destroy 
any moth eggs and larvae that may be in the sheets, and then 
sheets should be properly stored to prevent reinfestation. 

Farm sheets can be fumigated with methyl bromide in late fall 
or winter, or any other time when the temperature is suitable, by 
tying sheets into small bundles and sealing them under a plastic 
cover out in the garden or flower bed, using the same method 
used in fumigating the tobacco seedbed. In fact, burlap sheets 
could be fumigated at the time seedbeds are fumigated. However, 
growers must be cautioned against the possibility of spreading 
the mosaic virus from some virus infested sheets to the seedbed 
since fumigation may not kill the virus. For this reason, it is 
suggested that burlap sheets be fumigated in a garden spot or 
flower bed or some place away from the tobacco seedbed. 

After farm burlap sheets have been fumigated, sheets should 
be aired for 48 hours and then folded and packed into large plas- 
tic bags such as the ones used for leaves and then sealed tightly 
to prevent further infestation, until the next marketing season. 

4. Finally, it is essential that proper sanitation practices be fol- 
lowed in and around the farm packhouse after the marketing 
season is over. Packhouses should be thoroughly cleaned of all 
scrap tobacco and dust, which should be burned or spread thinly 
on fields. If there had been any moth infestation, packhouse 
should be sprayed with pyrethrum as recommended by extension 
entomologists to kill larvae that may be in cracks and crevices. 



Where tobacco is carried over from one season to the next, it 
should be covered and checked often, and in addition to sanitation 
practices, vapona (DDVP or dichlorvos) strips and resin strips 
should be used as recommended by extension entomologists. 

Now is the time for all segments of the tobacco industry from the 
farmer to the processor to tackle this growing problem caused by 
the tobacco moth before it reaches a crisis stage. A "stitch in time" 
could save many economic disasters. 




Forklift powered belt conveyors pick up six sheets, three from each row. 



Scheduling - 
Key To Market Improvements 

Improved methods and equipment for handling tobacco are occur- 
ring with resultant changes that are materially helping the grower, 
warehouseman, and tobacco purchaser. However, scheduling is the 
key to these improvements. Scheduling permits the grower to drive 
to the warehouse and have his tobacco unloaded without waiting in 
line. The sheets are unloaded from the truck by warehouse em- 
ployees using a chain hoist to eliminate any handling by the grower. 
The sheets are then moved to the sales floor by conveyors and fork- 
lifts which eliminate manual labor by warehouse employees. After 
the sale, the sheets are tied and tobacco is moved to the company 
loadout door using a new system incorporating forklifts and con- 
veyors that reduces the cost by as much as 50 percent. 

S 



Scheduling the growers' tobacco to the auction warehouse elimi- 
nates many inefficiencies and helps provide a well-balanced market- 
ing system. An important benefit is that the grower is not required 
to wait in line at the warehouse to have his truck unloaded. 

The scheduling system is put into effect when the grower and the 
warehouseman agree on the number of sheets (or pounds) of to- 
bacco the grower will bring to the warehouse. The warehouseman 
places this information in a scheduling book and gives the grower 
a "scheduling card". The grower and the warehouseman then know 
the exact time and date that the grower will have his sheets of 
tobacco unloaded for sale. When the grower arri-ves at the ware- 
house with his tobacco at the assigned time, he presents his "sched- 
uling card" so that headings on the tobacco sales bill and scale 
tickets can be filled out. This procedure minimizes delays at the 
scale when his tobacco is weighed. Most warehouses can use two 
men for scheduling — a scheduler and a ticket maker — who normal- 
ly schedule at a rate of 150 sheets per hour. 

According to Albert H. Graves, Industrial Engineer, USDA, ARS, 
TFRD, a seven-man crew can unload 25,000 to 30,000 pounds per 
hour. The seven-man crew consists of one chain hoist operator who 
moves the tobacco from the truck to the conveyor belt; one man on 
the truck to hook the sheets to the chain hoist; one weighmaster 
who operates the power conveyor belt and weighs the sheets of 
tobacco; one man who staples scale ticket to sheet; two forklift 
truck operators who control the power conveyor leading from the 
scale as they load and move sheets to sales floor; and one man 
stationed on the sales floor to position and untie sheets. This pro- 
cedure permits management to plan ahead to assure maximum use 
of labor. 

During the last marketing season, Al Graves and his assistant 
Ray Forest designed, built and tested a system for moving sheets of 
tobacco when breaking the floor following the sale. This operation 
was designed to improve the efficiency and to speed up the process 
of moving company purchases from the sales floor to the company 
loadout area. A "salebreaker" (forklift truck equipped with two 
powered belt conveyors), two parallel assembled gravity conveyors 
and seven men were used in this system to break the sale. 

In this operation, a standard 3,000 pound capacity forklift truck 
equipped with the standard auxiliary hydraulic power outlet was used 
to transport six sheets of tobacco on powered belt conveyors, one 
mounted on each side of the forklift. The operator of the "sale- 
breaker" drives into two rows of sheets with the conveyor belts lift- 
ing and rolling under the sheets of tobacco as the forklift advances. 
The forklift then backs down the sales row to the distribution area 



where two gravity conveyors are positioned about halfway down the 
two rows of tobacco being moved. The fork is raised as the truck 
travels with the correct elevation for unloading when arriving at the 
parallel distribution conveyors. The sheets are moved onto the 
gravity distribution conveyor ramps by the powered belt conveyors 
on the forklift. While the forklift goes after another load of tobacco 
the sheets of tobacco on the gravity conveyor ramps are placed on 
jacks (dollies). Two men at the end of each ramp pull the sheets off 
the conveyors onto company jacks. Two other men are available for 
moving the jacks to the company loadout area after the second sheet 
is placed on the jack. This system permits a crew of seven men (one 
salebreaker operator, four jackers and two pushers) to remove 
sheets of tobacco from the sales floor at a rate of 60,000 pounds 
per hour at one half the present cost. 

Tobacco Industry Shows Strength 

The tobacco industry as a whole, from the farmer to the manu- 
facturer, enjoyed one of its better years in 1971. Flue-cured and 
burley tobacco growers received record prices, and manufacturers 
of cigarettes reported increases in profits. All of which indicates 
that the tobacco industry is alive and growing. 

No doubt the anti-tobacco forces were surprised to learn that the 
ban on electronic advertising of cigarettes, which became effective 
on January 2, 1971, and the stronger health warning on the pack 
had no significant adverse effect on the consumption of cigarettes 
in the United States. In fact, cigarette consumption increased more 
than 2 percent in the U. S. in 1971 in spite of the advertising ban 
and stronger warning. This increase in U. S. tax-paid sales of cigar- 
ettes at state levels pushed domestic consumption to a record level 
of around 538 billion cigarettes last year. 

However, based on available data, it appears that total output of 
cigarettes in 1971 may be only slightly higher than the 583 billion 
manufactured in 1970. This would indicate that large volumes of 
cigarettes were drawn from manufactured inventories carried over 
from the previous year to supply the increase in the domestic market 
during 1971. 

One of the biggest problems facing the domestic tobacco industry 
at this time is in the area of indiscreet escalation of state and local 
taxes on cigarettes. At this time, there are 35 states that have 
cigarette taxes ranging from 10 cents to 21 cents per package. The 
National Tobacco Tax Council has launched a broad new program 
this year in an effort to reverse the trend in this critical area of rising 
state and local cigarette taxes. 

The increase in cigarette sales during the past two years was 

10 



reflected in a stronger market demand during the 1971 season for 
both flue-cured and burley tobacco. Flue-cured and burley tobacco 
make up more than 80 percent of the tobacco that goes into the 
U. S. cigarette blend. 

1971 Marketing Season 

The 1971 flue-cured marketmg season will go down in history as 
one of the best on record from an overall point of view. There were 
no major congestions in processing facilities during the season, no 
market holidays and, contrary to the usual trend, prices held up 
throughout the marketing season and actually strengthened on some 
grades as the season progressed. Also, the quality of the crop 
throughout the flue-cured area was the best in recent years. 

This good market situation resulted in record high prices for flue- 
cured and burley tobacco growers. Tarheel flue-cured growers re- 
ceived a record average price of $77.60 per hundred for 711 million 
pounds sold in 1971, giving them a gross return of $552 million 
which is second only to the record $562 million received from the 
1970 crop. While the volume of flue-cured sales was down 9.3 per- 
cent from the previous year, the gross income was down only $10 
million or 1.8 percent which reflected the increase in price of $5.50. 

North Carolina burley tobacco growers, who were operating under 
a new poundage program for the first time in 1971, also received 
a record of $80.00 per hundred for a 14.5 million pound crop which 
was about 20 percent short of their effective quota. This was the 
smallest crop that Tarheel burley growers have produced since the 
late 1940's. However, with an increase in average price of $7.00 
per hundred over the previous year, the gross return to burley 
growers of about $11.5 million was still the lowest average income 
from burley for the last several years. 

Outlook for 1972 

The outlook for 1972 is for another good year for the entire 
tobacco industry. The heavy surpluses of the past several years for 
flue-cured and burley tobacco are being brought under control, with 
the flue-cured supply now approaching normal levels. The short 
crop of burley in 1971 will make a big dent in the burley surplus. 
Recent economic moves in wage and price freezes should serve to 
level the cost of production for both farmers and industry during 
the year ahead to give some relief in the tightening cost-price 
squeeze that all segments of the industry have experienced during 
the past several years. The devaluation of the U. S. dollar will likely 
stimulate activity in foreign sales of both flue-cured and burley 
tobaccos in the year ahead. 

11 



The U. S. basic flue-cured quota for 1972 is for 1,071.6 million 
pounds, which is substantially the same as the base quota for the 
past two years. However, overmarketings of the 1971 crop exceeded 
undermarketing by approximately 8 million pounds. Thus, effective 
U. S. flue-cured farm quotas for 1972 are for 1,063 million pounds 
— about one percent below the 1971 effective quota. 

For North Carolina, the base flue-cured quota for 1972 remains 
at about 707 million pounds. However, overmarketings in 1971 re- 
duced the N. C. 1972 effective flue-cured quota to around 700 mil- 
lion pounds. This is an indication that N. C. flue-cured growers will 
probably have about the same amount of tobacco to sell in 1972 as 
they sold last season. 

The national burley quotas under the new poundage program were 
reduced five percent for 1972. However, this amounted to only about 
four percent reduction because of a provision in the law whereby 
growers who were under minimum quotas prior to 1972 could be 
cut only 21/2 percent for 1972 and 1973. 

In North Carolina, the 1972 reduction in base burley quotas 
amounted to only about 3 percent because of the large number of 
growers who were below the minimum of V2 acre. However, since 
N. C. burley tobacco growers undermarketed their 1971 quotas by 
approximately 20 percent, the N. C. 1972 effective quota after ad- 
justment for undermarketing, will probably be at least 15 percent 
larger than last year even with a cut in base quotas. 

Based on increases in the cost of production during the past three 
years, the price support for tobacco growers will increase about 5 
percent in 1972. This, tied in with the generally good outlook, would 
indicate a market average of around $80.00 per hundred pounds for 
both flue-cured and burley tobacco growers in 1972 if they can 
come up with another good, medium to thin body, cigarette crop 
comparable to the extra good crops of 1971. 



State Marketing Summary 1971-72 

History will acknowledge 1971 as one of the most successful 
marketing seasons recorded by the North Carolina tobacco industry. 
Tobacco circulated through the auction system at a uniform pace, 
which permitted processors to handle leaf purchases without serious- 
ly congesting processing facilities. All segments of the tobacco in- 
dustry should be commended for their efforts in producing a very 
successful marketing season from an overall point of view. 

A few of the factors recognized as contributing to the record- 
breaking season were: the holding of total sales opportunity to an 
optimum volume during heavier marketing weeks of each belt by the 

12 



Industry-Wide Flue-Cured Marketing Committee; the strong company 
demand for most all offerings throughout the selling season; the 
implementing of systematic scheduling by warehousemen to allow 
farmers a more convenient and reasonable way of delivering leaf to 
market; and the production of a very fine smoking crop by the 
tobacco farmers. 

Flue-cured average price for North Carolina made a $5.92 leap 
during 1971 to a new record high average of $77.64 per hundred 
pounds. Even though North Carolina flue-cured markets sold 76,- 
279,111 pounds less tobacco in 1971 than in 1970, revenue from 
producers sales decreased only $16,335,182. 

Burley prices for the 1971-72 season were exceptionally good. 
Demand for all burley grades exceeded supply in North Carolina. No 
sales went under government loan in any North Carolina burley 
market. Average price soared upward to an all-time record high of 
$79.77 per hundred pounds, which is $6.94 more than last year's 
average. 

TYPE 13. Border Belt markets held opening sales on August 3 
to begin North Carolina's 1971 auction* season. Sales continued 
consecutively for 34 sales days with final sales occurring September 
30, except for a clean-up sale in Whiteville on October 12, 13 and 
14. In the opinion of most Border Belt farmers and warehousemen, 
the decreased sales opportunity allocated to the Border Beit did not 
give local farmers enough sales time to market all of their crop. 

Quality of marketings improved considerably over last year. Offer- 
ings contained larger percentages of lugs and cutters and smaller 
percentages of primings and poor leaf grades. 

Grade price averages increased $2.00-$13.00 per hundred pounds 
with greatest increases occurring in low and poor quality primings 
and leaf. Fair quality offerings were up $2.00-$3.00 per hundred 
pounds. The Border Belt season average set a new record of $75.80 
per hundred pounds, up $4.12 per hundred pounds from the pre- 
vious season's average. 

Producer sales for 1971 declined sharply to 118,800,860 pounds 
valued at $90,050,761 as compared to 1970 when 137,255,588 
pounds sold for $98,379,258. 

Stabilization receipts from Border Belt markets decreased in 
1971. Volume totaled 9,309,555 pounds and amounted to 7.8 per- 
cent of producer sales. Receipts in 1970 were 15,325,283 pounds 
or 11.2 percent of producer sales. 

TYPE 12. Eastern Belt markets opened for a third consecutive 
record-breaking season on August 30, the latest opening date in 
30 years. Sales continued through the season without any inter- 
ruptions and final sales were held November 11, giving Eastern Belt 
markets 43 sales days. 

Quality showed substantial improvement in 1971 with increased 

13 



volumes of ripe grades being marketed. Offerings contained a larger 
percentage of good leaf and fair lugs and a much smaller proportion 
of nondescript. 

Grade price averages advanced $1.00-$13.00 per hundred pounds 
with the higher gains going to unripe variegated leaf and nondescript. 
Most of the ripe straight grades increased $1.00-$5.00 per hundred 
pounds. Overall, the Eastern Belt average reached $78.53 per hun- 
dred pounds, up $5.70 per hundred pounds from the 1970 average. 
This was the highest average ever achieved by any North Carolina 
flue-cured belt. 

Producer sales for 1971 were down in Eastern Belt markets. 
Farmers sold 316,362,168 pounds for a return of $248,454,294. 
In 1970, farmers marketed 358,241,279 pounds for a price of 
$260,897,452. 

Stabilization received 6.1 percent of producer sales or 19,204,496 
pounds of Type 12 sales in 1971, a favorable decline from 1970 
receipts when 12.1 percent of producer sales or 43,250,895 pounds 
went under government loan. 

TYPE IIB. Middle Belt markets began auction sales on Septem- 
ber 13, and prices soared to new record heights. Markets operated 
over a period of 36 sales days with final sales for the record-breaking 
season occurring November 16. This was the shortest sales season 
on record for Middle Belt markets. 

Quality-wise, the 1971 crop displayed more desirable character- 
istics than have been seen on Middle Belt markets in several years. 
Marketings consisted primarily of mature to mellow grades with a 
small percentage of poor quality and nondescript being sold. 

Grade price averages moved upward $1.00-$16.00 per hundred 
pounds over last year. The larger increases occurred for unripe 
variegated and nondescript grades. Most grades were up $2.00- 
$7.00 per hundred pounds. The Middle Belt season average estab- 
lished a new record of $77.28 per hundred pounds, surpassing the 
1970 belt average by $7.21 per hundred pounds. 

Producer sales decreased in 1971 to 113,235,768 pounds which 
sold Tor $87,505,872; whereas, in 1970 producers sold 125,465,425 
pounds for a price of $87,914,387. Even though volume was down 
12,229,657 pounds in 1971, returns to farmers decreased only 
$408,515. 

Stabilization received 5,400,965 pounds or 4.8 percent of pro- 
ducer sales from Middle Belt markets. In 1970, Stabilization re- 
ceived 19,715,332 pounds amounting to 15.7 percent of producer 
sales. 

TYPE HA. Old Belt markets were not allowed an early opening 
in 1971, so regular season opening sales began on September 20. 
Season sales were spread over a period of 34 sales days, the 
shortest Old Belt season on record. Final sales for North Carolina 

14 



Old Belt markets were held November 18, concluding a very success- 
ful North Carolina flue-cured season. 

Quality was unusually good. Marketings improved very favorably 
over 1970 sales. Offerings contained larger percentages of fair to 
good, true color, grades with a substantial drop in poor variegated 
and nondescript grades. 

Grade price averages reached new record levels. Gains of $1.00- 
$17.00 per hundred pounds took place with the larger increases go- 
ing to nondescript and to green and red variegated leaf. Most prices 
advanced $1.00-$9.00 per hundred pounds. The North Carolina 
Old Belt season average established a new record of $77.43 per 
hundred pounds, an increase of $7.48 per hundred pounds over 
the 1970 belt average.. 

Producers sales volume was down, but value was up in 1971. 
Farmers sold 99,580,900 pounds for a return of $77,104,749. Dur- 
ing 1970, farmers sold 103,296,515 pounds for only $72,259,761. 

Stabilization received 3,774,199 pounds or 3.8 percent of pro- 
ducer sales, the smallest percentage of any North Carolina flue- 
cured belt. In 1970, 11,982,818 pounds or 11.6 percent of producer 
sales went to Stabilization. 

TYPE 31. Burley markets opened November 22 to begin selling 
the first crop produced under the poundage allotment program. Due 
to heavy rainfall, volume fell short of the effective poundage for 
North Carolina. Markets operated for a period of 19 sales days and 
closed for the season on January 6. 

Quality was exceptionally good in North Carolina markets. Most 
all offerings were thin to medium in body and possessed good color 
characteristics. Marketings contained large percentages of good to 
choice grades and nominal amounts of low and nondescript grades. 

Grade price averages increased $4.00-$17.00 per hundred pounds 
with the greatest increases occurring on grades having a low sup- 
port price. Prices paid for marketings differed very little regardless 
of grade. The average price for all North Carolina burley sales in 
1971-72 established a remarkable record of $79.77 per hundred 
pounds, up $6.94 per hundred pounds above the previous season's 
average. 

Producer sales in North Carolina dropped to the lowest point since 
1946. Growers sold only 12,522,449 pounds on the three North 
Carolina markets for a return of $9,989,391 in 1971-72. During 
the 1970-71 season, producers sold 16,111,388 pounds valued at 
$11,734,599. 

No burley tobacco was placed under government loan in North 
Carolina during the 1971-72 season compared to 207,066 pounds 
or 1.3 percent of producer sales going under loan during the 1970- 
71 season. This is an unprecedented record for this state and is 
also a tribute to the North Carolina burley industry. 

15 






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(/) 
o 

O) 



o 
u 
u 

TO 
O 



TO 

o 

o 



U) 


a> 


o 


O 


0) 


u 


o 


> 

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O. 

in 


o 


in 
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C 
3 




re 


O 


O 


to 


Q. 




0) 




(/) 


Ol 


0) 


(A 


ID 


o 












O 


> 

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a. 

in 






■D 






C 


o 




3 


O 


<0 
CO 

0) 
in 


O 

a. 




D 






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0) 




.r 






m 


in 

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oe: 

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m 






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tt 








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in 


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0) 


c 






3 

o 

Q. 


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Q. 




(A 



OC0OOOU-)OO 

cococo.— 00'— roo 

CN .— ^' ^ O .— CO — 

•be- 



oDOcooococMvO-^ 
sOCMOLou-)or\co 
r-vcooco'^cMcoo 

CS 0^ .— .— (> ^ K OD 
OC0>000'— OLD.— 
CO CM -^ ■— O .— -^ 



1— 


CN 


o 


00 


^ 


00 


Ul 


O 


o 


CM 


^ 


K 


CO 


, CN 


CO 


CM 


00 


CO 


Q£ 


CO 


CO 


CM 


LO 


r^ 


1 — 


CN 


on 


1^ 


o 














Q 






' 






Ctf 












O 












OQ 













CO'— COO-OOOLOO 



L 




^ 




— 


c 


>- 


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O 


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c 
o 
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> 
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u 
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r 






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ID 


> 



00 


hv 


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CM 


CN 


K 


^ 


hv 


00 


^ 


o 


U-) 


CO 


o 


o 


o 


CN 


U-) 


o 


hv 


■^ 


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00 


' — 


r— 


CO 


CO 


in 


o- 


CO 


l\ 


-^ 


00 


, 


,_ 


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f> 


CN 


o 


CO 


CO 


^ 


LO 


o 


CO 


00 


u^ 


rv, 


CO 


CO 


'— 


rv. 


CM 


r— 


o 


CD 


i\ 


o 


O 


o 

CO 


o 


o 

CO 


CO 



CO 


CM 




o 
o 


CO 


1^ 


UO 


uo 






IT) 


to 




■^ 
r^ 






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o 


hv 


on 


00 


o 


00 


^ 


CM 


Ul 


^ 


o 


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o 


^ 


CJ> 


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t> 


^ 


-^ 


o 


o 


-'T 


CO 


o 


' — 


^ 


c> 


o 


CO 


,_ 


lO 


o 


00 


CN 


■^ 


CO 


CO 


Ch 


u-i 


Ul 


LO 


, — 


Ul 


C> 


^o 


rv 


r— 


'— 


^ 


i\ 


00 


K 


o 


t> 


rx 


h- 


K 


CO 

CO 


l\ 


CN 


1^ 


CN 


CM 
CN 



,_ 


LO 


o 


K 


rv 


00 


CO 


^ 


o 


CO 


o 


00 


CM 


-^ 


CO 


00 


o 


o 


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C) 


Ul 


00 


U-) 


CO 


CM 


CM 


00 


^0 


CM 


o 


, — 


, — 


^ 


^ 


CO 


o 


CN 


o 


o 


o 


•o 


1 — 


o 


-<t 


o 


^ 


o 


o 


l\ 


Ul 


•— 


Ul 


CO 


00 


r\ 


o 


rv 


CO 


K 


CM 


l\ 


Cvl 


CO 



o 


CO 

o 


CO 


o 

CO 




CO 

o 




00 
CO 


00 


00 


LO 

CO 


CN 

o 


CO 


00 
CO 


CN 


-^ 


CN 




CM 


o 


r^ 




CM 


CO 


CN 

r-. 


r^ 


r\ 


o 


CN 


hN 


F^ 


r^ 


CN 




CN 


CM 



CN 


CO 


o 


o 


00 


K 


O 


■^ 


vO 


^ 


l\ 


1^ 


^ 


^ 


o 


o 


^ 


>o 


•o 


o 


UO 


CO 


1 — 


o 


rx 


Ul 


CO 


. — 


O 


1 — 


IX 


o 


CO 




•o 


o 


CM 


CM 


lO 


CO 


o 


Ul 


CM 


o 


o 


00 


00 


CN 


CO 


r-v 


CM 


^ 


Ul 




CO 


CO 


00 


00 


uo 


CN 


l\ 


t\ 


hv 


CN 


_ 


O 


,_ 


vO 


CN 


CM 


o 


, 


-^ 


CN 


vO 


CO 


r-N 


O 


CO 


■^ 


o 


h. 


Ul 


O 


^ 


i\ 


. — 


Ul 


Ul 


^ 


CO 


1 — 


•— 


CM 


■— 


CO 


-o 


-^ 


^ 


I^ 


o 


CN 


o 


CM 


l\ 


-o 


o 


CN 


Ch 


o 


, 


CO 


,_ 


CN 


CM 


o 


Ul 


CN 


o 


, 


o 


o 


o 


CO 


o 


K 






— 


CN 


— 


Ul 


-^ 




-q- 


CN 


■— 


— 








-o 




-O 



IX o rx 

O Ul l\ 


Ul 


CN 

o 


o o 
CO o 


^ 


i-v 00 
o — 


K o o 
Ul O o 


o 


CN l\ ■— 

r^ ^ r- 


Ul 


i\ hv i\ 
i\ r-v i\ 


o 
i\ 




CO CO 


i\ 


CO 00 


l\ K l\ 
ix K r^ 




00 O 00 

i\ rv 1^ 


00 



^ Q. 



CO 


O 


00 


CM 


O 


Ul 


l\ 


IV 


l\ 


-o 


■o 


o 


o 


CO 


CN 


o 


Ul 


o 


on 


•^ 


o 


CM 


-<T 


l\ 


00 


rv 


00 


CM 


o 


o 


o 


i\ 


■ — 


Ul 


Ul 


CN 


O 


o 


'— 


•— 


CM 


O 


^ 


^ 


-^ 


Ul 


o 


hN 


1 — 


•o 


CO 


o 


o 


CM 


CN 


^ 


NO 


04 


,_ 


^ 


o 


on 


Ul 


rv. 


CN 


o- 


rv 


-^ 


o 


Ul 


CN 


f> 


K 


CM 


o 


1 — 


^ 


o 


CO 


CO 


o 


1 — 


•^ 


o 


o- 


, — 


o 


^ 


l\ 




•— 


N. 


Ul 


Ul 


•— 


CM 


o 


o 


O 


i\ 


O 


■o 


o 


CO 


rv 


Ul 


n 


Ul 


O 


O 


o 


o 

CN 


O 


•O 


■o 

CO 


00 


o 


o 


O 


o 


CO 


o 


o 


Ul 


00 


CN 
CM 



Q CN'^OCOCMOO-«tUlsOOI\Or^CNOO'<t'^ 

rj oouicoo-^ococsiO'— ocMi\o>— coui 

~ hvCO'— O^-— O-OOCOhNCONO-— '— "<TO 

ij i-C -^^ MD '— "" Ul '— ~ CI CD MO co~ cs rC (> co~ co" .— ~ tC 
I o-ocooor^ocNCNcovo-^-^orvoO'— Ul 

JUr— .— CN r^-^COUlcOCN •— CO'— 



(J <J Ll_ U- U I h- 



< U Q u_ 



zz 


8 > 


c 


o 


^ 


0) 


o 










> 






b 


-5 ^ 


c 


CD 
O 


u 
O 


'f 


-Q 


u_ 


O O 


M 


ca. 


C^ 


to 


1— 



o 



(D <U (D TZ TZ .~ 



CN 


^ 


o 


CO 


TJ- 


O 


,_ 


00 


o 


o 


o 


^ 


•o 


CM 


^ 


O 


o 


c> 


nO 


^ 


CN 


|N^ 


-o 


Ul 


00 


. — 


c> 


o 


•o 


C3 


on 


vO 


' — 


IN^ 


O 


o 


hs 


00 


K 


K 


00 


l\ 


00 


o 


CN 


K 


Ul 


o 


-o 


CO 


O 


o 


CN 


Ul 


l\ 


^ 


^ 


CO 




o 


-o 


00 


Ul 


00 


' 


o 


^ 


o 

CO 


O 


CM 


O 


o 


■" 


' 




CO 


N. 


■O 
CN 


-^ 


Ul 



o CO '— .— 
r~v o CO CN 


o o ^ 

O Ul K 


CO CO CN 
CO — CN 


— CN '— 
IX O O 


IX o -^ rx 

.— CO o .— 


CO 

Ul 


rs. rx i\ o 
rx r^ hs 1^ 


o 00 00 
r^ hs r\ 


N. CO 00 

IX rv IX 


IX K CO 

rx IX IX 


rx 00 o CO 
rx rx IX tx 


00 
rx 



Ul 


CN 


o 


Ul 


CN 


-^ 


o 


CN 


o 


CN 


O 


o 


CN 


CM 


00 


CO 


rx 


CO 


CN 


c> 


CO 


CM 


CO 


CO 


CN 


00 


CN 


Ul 


CM 


CO 


^ 


rx 


CN 


CN 


1 — 


o 


O 


<3 


o 


^ 


r^ 


00 


IX 


O 


00 


^ 


CO 


r-N 


Ul 


o 


O 


O 


Ul. 


■ — 


-^ 


O 


CO 


vO 


Ul 


o 


O 


,_ 


o 


o 


IX 


00 


o 


Ul 


O 


"t 


00 


CM 


IX 


Ul 


Ul 


CN 


CM 


CO 


CM 


IX 


Ul 


Ul 


IX 


CO 


CO 


o 


CO 


O 


nQ 


•O 


o 


O 


CO 


1 — 


o 


i — 


''T 


CO 


^ 


CN 


rx 


o 


Ul 


CN 


O 


•^ 


CN 


CO 


00 


O 


o 


o 

CN 


o 


Ul 


•o 

CO 


CO 


CO 


O 


00 


o 


CO 


O 


O- 


Ul 
Ul 


CO 


CO 



16 





CO 
LD 


00 
CN 










o 


o 


CN 




<3 


•O 


O 




R 


o 


O 




r^ 


00 

o 


o 



CO 
00 


U-, 


00 


00 
CN 


^ 
■^ 




CO 


■o 

o 


o 


o 


00 


MO 


CO 


CO 

•o 


cs 
1^ 


00 


o 


00 


00 

•o 


o 


o 




o 


R 



o 


o 


^o 


, 


K 


CO 


o 


^ 


o 


CN 


t\ 


CO 


o 




O 


"^ 


t-v 


^ 


o 


1 — 


CN 


00 


•^ 


-^ 


f— 


CO 


o 


■— 


CN 


vO 


(.-> 


r\ 


o 


o 


-q- 


LO 


CN 


CO 


-o 


-o 


<l 


o 


o 


l\ 


ro 


^o 


00 


O 


CO 


. — 


o 


CN 


o 


C) 


00 


o 


^ 


•— 


•— 


CO 


CO 


o 


CO 


hv 


U) 


o 


K 


rv. 


K 
CN 


o 


00 


K 


00 


o 


K 


00 


o 

CN 



in 


^ 


o 


-o 


o 


tv 


-^ 


CN 


CO 


o 


K 


00 


o 


o 


r-s 


LO 


, — 


o 


-o 


CO 


IV 


U-) 


-^ 


00 


U-) 


-'f 


CO 


CO 


o 


>— 


rv 


l-v 


o 


CO 


vO 


■— 


LT) 


I\ 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


U-) 


o 


on 


i\ 


CO 


U-) 


CO 


U-) 


o 


u~t 


K 


. — 


. — 


^ 


O 


. — 


IV 


-<t 


I\ 


o 


LO 


h-. 


CO 


00 


rv 


CJ 


O 


CJ 


CO 


o 


CO 


o 


Ul 


rx 


IV 


o 


o 


o 

CO 


^ 


o 


o 
rv 



o 


•o 


00 


rv 


LO 


IV 


o 


^ 


CO 


-^ 


o 


,_ 


<:> 


CN 


rv 


CJ 


CO 


o 



00 


CO 


LO 


o 

CN 


CO 

r^ 


Csl 


o 
o 




CN 
00 


CO 

•o 


o 


LO 

rv 


•o 
rv 


IV 

tv 




CO 

rv 


r^ 
r^ 


00 
rv 


rv 


rx 
rv 


LO 

rv 


rv 
tv 



IV LO rv 

TT ^ ^ 


CN CO — CO LO LO -^ 

LO o rv o >o -^ -^ 


o 


■o 


<3 -O 00 

rv IV rv 


<5 IV IV >0 IV 00 CO 

IV rv IV IV rv r>. rv 


rv 
rv 


rv 
rv 



rv CO o 

o 00 o 

d> (> (> 

00 rv rv 



o 


,_ 


"^ 


, 


o 


CO 


^ 


o 


lO 


co 


IT) 


m 


rv 


n— 


o 


CN 


CN 


CN 


o 


o 


IV 


00 


o 


00 


•o 


TT 


CN 


CN 


■o 


■o 


o 


•o 


C) 


CN 


lO 


rv 


•o 


V 


rv 


,— 


CO 


o- 


, — 


CO 


rv 


vO 


CN 


o 


rv 


rv 


CO 


rv 


•o 


00 


rv 


.— 


o 


CO 


^ 


o 


00 


o 


^ 


•— 


•o 


CO 


rv 


rv 


CO 
CN 


lO 


rv 


LO 


00 


rv 


rv 


rv 


■o 



CN 


o 


,_ 


CN 


CO 


00 


vO 


,— 


o 


CN 


<3 


CM 


1 — 


LO 


o 


CN 


Csl 


^ 


1 — 


C) 


o 


rv 


-O 


CN 


-^ 


CN 


<N 


O 


CO 


CN 


LO 


' — 


^ 


o 


C) 


CO 


o 


^ 


LO 


,_ 


o 


00 


CN 


CO 


CN 


^ 


rv 


CO 


-^ 


00 


CO 


CO 


00 


LO 


C5 


■ — 


LO 


CN 


CO 


o 


-^ 


CS 


K 


o 


o 


rv 


^ 


IV 


00 


rv 


lO 


CO 


rv 


rv 


IV 


o 


IV 


00 


00 


rv 


LO 

CO 


LO 


CO 

o 


LO 



o ^ CO 

CN -^ r— 

O O CN 

rC c> o" 

O LO o 

_ o o — 

n rv CO CO 



o- 


^ 


o 


•o 


CO 


o 


LO 


LO 


o 


CN 


-^ 


CM 


, — 


CO 


o 


CN 


CN 


CO 


IV 


C) 


-o 


1 — 


■— 


o 


00 


rv 


IV 


o 


rv 


CO 


00 


CO 


o 


rv 


CO 


o 


LO 


O^ 


CN 


^ 


o 


00 


^ 


o 


^ 


o 


LO 


o 


1 — 


•o 


CO 


rv 


LO 


o 


o 


' 


' 


IV 


' 


LO 


' 


' 


' 




CN 


LO 

CN 



O 


00 


^- 


CN 


CN 


o 


00 


CO 


CO 


sO 


CO 


o 


CJ 


CN 


I'J 


00 


CO 


IV 


-^ 


LO 


1 — 


n- 


LO 


o 


•— 


O 


o 


■— 


O 


vO 


•o 


o 


•— 


CO 


LO 


CO 


K 


o 


O 


CM 


IV 


00 


00 


,— 


o 


, 


^ 


-^ 


LO 


^ 


^ 


^ 


LO 


■^ 


1 — 


LO 


00 


sO 


1 — 


. — 




' 


t'J 




' 


' 


' 


' 


IV 


CS 


CN 
CO 


co" 



_ OJ o o 

" IV ,— O 

^ CN CN CN 

3 rv co"^ CN 

u o ^ o 



- < 



CN-^COCN-^-^OO"^-^ 

ooLooo-ocNcoorv 

"^OC>-0'— (>■— C0<5LO 
rv 00~ CN CN SD o"" (> .— ~ •— co" 
CO.— rvco-— CNLO"^ 

LO .— .— 



SDIVCO.— .— •O-o-^'^oo 
ocovococoo'— Looorv 


00 
CN 


Lo^orvTjcoivoo-oivio 
rvivrvivrvrvKrvrviv 


rv 

IV 



1 


00 


~o 


o 


-^ 


^ 


00 


00 


CN 


en 




00 


o 


CO 


o 


CO 


<^ 


CO 


00 


LO 


^ 


^ 


o- 


o 


00 


o 


^ 


CO 


CN 


IV 


LU 


^ 


CJ 


LO 


LO 


LO 


CN 




o 


<1 




■— 


o 


CN 


o 




CN 




o 


IV 


O 




■" 


■" 


■" 








CN 





00 rv 1j o 
o LO HI .— 

O CN CO "^ 









3 
CO 




ocorvcN — -^ooorvcN 

LOLO.— vOCMrvO-O'^CO 


CO 






CN IV CO 

r- rv o 


•o<3covorvrvivivcoco 
ivivivrvivrvrvrvrviv 


rv 
rv 


IV 

rv 


O O CO 

CO rv IV 



CO 


CO 


, 


CO 


^ 


o 


c> 


en 


LO 


IV 


CO 


■o 


o 


CO 


o 


o 


CO 


-o 


o 


CN 


CO 


o 


'^ 


00 


00 


o 


CO 


CO 


K 


o 


LO 


rv 


rv 


IV 


CO 


^ 


,_ 


,_ 


TT 


K 


, 


O 


CO 


LO 


CO 


^ 


o 


o 


^ 


00 


00 


o 


O 


00 


CO 


o 


o 


'^ 


■— 


^ 


<3 


rv 


CN 


■ — 


CO 


CN 


o 


o 


CN 
CN 


LO 


•o 


LO 


IV 


IV 


IV 


IV 


CO 



T^OOOCM"^OLO.— 00 
CNLO-OOO^OCOO.— 

oococorvLoo-^.— .— LO 
K CN 00 CO CN crT r— ' ^"" oo" <) 

IV-TJ-OOOCMOO-OIVOO 

cooco-q-rv-ocNLolvc^ 
lv~ K rv <) K oo" CO Iv co" Lo" 
CO 



■o 


.- — IV 


o 


lO 


o 


"^ CO IV 


^ 


^ 


•o 


CN rv -^ 


^ 


r— 










o 


rv o 00 


CM 


CM 


IV 


CO Tt 00 


CN 


O 


o 


00 00 00 


LO 


LO 


rv 


■O CM CM 


CN 


o 


^ 




r— 


-o 


•o 






>o 







o 



cqOS^Si^ 



C -D 



0) 

D 
(J 



<c§^ 



-^ < 



17 



Summary of N. C. Dealer and 
Warehouse Resales — 1971 



Percentage 
Belt Pounds Dollars Resales 



Border Belt 
Dealer 
Warehouse 

Eastern Beit 
Dealer 
Warehouse 

Middle Belt 
Dealer 
Warehouse 

Old Belt 

Dealer 
Warehouse 

Total Flue-Cured Resales 

Burley Belt 
Dealer 
Warehouse 

Total Burley Resales 



727,386 
3,435,099 


$ 


530,785 
2,551,112 


0.59 
2.79 


1,458,960 
4,698,098 




1,055,310 
3,501,704 


0.45 
1.46 


1,071,003 
2,566,614 




781,929 
1,931,650 


0.92 
2.20 


741,908 
3,214,558 




541,563 
2,487,586 


0.72 
3.10 


17,913,626 


$13,381,639 


2.69 


242,886 
1,422,748 


$ 


192,526 
1,136,971 


1.71 
10.03 


1,665,634 


$ 


1,329,497 


11.74 



Producer and Gross Sales of Flue-Cured 
Tobacco By States — 1971 



Producer Sales Gross Sales 

State Pounds Average Pounds Average 

N. C. 
Va. 
S. C. 
Ga. 
Fla. 



Total 



647,979,696 


$77.64 


665,893,322 


$77.56 


111,425,351 


77.43 


113,870,247 


77.35 


140,288,541 


75.74 


145,305,993 


75.71 


148,183,511 


76.83 


154,092,395 


76.80 


26,438,571 


76.94 


27,574,748 


76.94 


1,074,315,670 


$77.24 


1,106,736,705 


$77.18 



18 



Flue-Cured Movement In and Out 
of North Carolina 



N. C. Tobacco Sold Out of State Out of State Tobacco Sold in N. C. 
(Pounds) (Pounds) 

State 1971 1970 1971 1970 



Va. 


24,616,564 


28,915,882 


7,120,885 


7,397,916 


S. C. 


21,831,607 


26,691,182 


8,588,961 


15,220,618 


Ga. 


26,780,462 


25,109,090 


70,903 


29,794 


Fla. 


5,240,997 


2,328,920 


-- 


-- 


Ala. 


-- 


- 


3,952 


516 


Total 


78,469,630 


83,045,074 


15,784,701 


22,648,844 



Burley Tobacco Movement In and Out 
of North Carolina 



N. C. Tobacco Sold Out of State Out of State Tobacco Sold in N. C. 
(Pounds) (Pounds) 

State 1971 1970 1971 1970 



Tenn. 


2,578,212 


3,596,804 


378,600 


463,392 


Va. 


6,070 


5,902 


902,092 


1,156,512 


W. Va. 






28,283 


28,462 


Ga. 







11,484 


38,368 


S. C. 






1,222 


1,644 


Total 


2,584,282 


3,602,706 


1,321,681 


1,688,378 



19 



Flue-Cured Stabilization Receipts 
By Types and States — 1971 



Producer Stabilization Percentage 

State Type Sales (lbs.) Receipts (lbs.) Stab. Received 



Va. Total 


1 lA 


n 1,425,351 


5,323,533 


4.8 


N. C. 


llA 


99,580,900 


3,774,199 


3.8 


N. C. 


IIB 


113,235,768 


5,400,965 


4.8 


N. C. 


12 


316,362,168 


19,204,496 


6.1 


N. C. 


13 


118,800,860 


9,309,555 


7.8 


N, C. Total 


11-13 


647,979,696 


37,689,215 


5.8 


S. C. Total 


13 


140,288,541 


6,201,610 


4.4 


Ga. Total 


14 


148,183,51 1 


5,103,447 


3.4 


Fla. Total 


14 


26,438,571 


1,352,366 


5.1 


Total All Types 


1,074,315,670 


55,670,171 


5.2 



Burley Stabilization Receipts 
For N.C. and Total U.S. — 1971-72 



State 


Type 


Producer 
Sales (lbs.) 


Stabilization 
Receipts (lbs.) 


Percentage 
Stab. Received 


N. C. 

U. S. Total 


31 
31 


12,522,449 
461,598,814 


-0- 
178,184 


-0- 
0.04 



20 



N. C. Burley Tobacco Allotments* 
1972 



Number Base Effective 

County Farms Poundage Poundage Rank 

Alleghany 

Ashe 

Avery 

Brunswick 

Buncombe 

Burke 

Caldwell 

Cherokee 

Clay 

Cleveland 

Davidson 

Gaston 

Graham 

Granville 

Haywood 

Henderson 

Iredell 

Jackson 

McDowell 

Macon 

Madison 

Mitchell 

Polk 

Rutherford 

Stokes 

Surry 

Swain 

Transylvania 

Watauga 

Wilkes 

Yancey 

TOTAL 17,731 19,010,981 24,321,715 1-31 

*Source: USDA Agricultural Stabilization and Conservation Service. 

21 



565 


561,586 


712,830 


9 


2,615 


2,335,518 


3,105,876 


4 


246 


255,783 


344,808 


10 


1 


167 


338 


31 


2,947 


2,893,649 


3,550,105 


2 


14 


7,559 


14,256 


21 


19 


10,781 


20,040 


20 


192 


131,413 


208,143 


14 


228 


157,770 


243,639 


12 


8 


4,598 


7,083 


22 


2 


1,364 


1,360 


27 


1 


696 


1,410 


28 


677 


599,831 


745,448 


8 


1 


252 


510 


30 


1,870 


1,830,578 


2,373,331 


5 


120 


77,506 


129,540 


16 


3 


2,757 


5,585 


24 


276 


204,311 


341,279 


11 


72 


46,851 


76,686 


17 


243 


146,301 


240,177 


13 


2,818 


4,427,472 


5,319,873 


1 


956 


1,104,898 


1,415,505 


7 


4 


1,982 


4,015 


26 


53 


28,655 


52,149 


19 


2 


570 


1,155 


29 


7 


2,429 


2,927 


25 


205 


127,671 


218,790 


15 


69 


46,080 


69,768 


18 


1,685 


1,657,262 


2,148,857 


6 


6 


3,256 


3,621 


23 


1,826 


2,341,435 


2,962,611 


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23 



North Carolina Burley Crops 
1928- 1971* 







Yield Per 








Year 


No. Acres 


Acre 


ProcJuction 


Value 


Average 






(PouncJs) 


(1,000 lbs.) (1 


,000 Dollars) 


Price 


1928 


3,600 


650 


2,340 


$ 690 


$29.50 


1929 


5,500 


730 


4,015 


863 


21.50 


1930 


7,200 


750 


5,400 


853 


15.80 


1931 


7,100 


710 


5,041 


464 


9.20 


1932 


6,500 


735 


4,778 


726 


15.20 


1933 


9,200 


785 


7,222 


715 


9.90 


1934 


5,500 


870 


4,785 


809 


17,50 


1935 


5,200 


925 


4,810 


1,025 


21.30 


1936 


6,000 


900 


5,400 


2,095 


38.80 


1937 


9,000 


975 


8,775 


1,787 


21.40 


1938 


8,600 


900 


7,740 


1,308 


16.90 


1939 


8,100 


1,070 


8,667 


1,447 


16.70 


1940 


6,500 


1,050 


6,825 


1,242 


18.20 


1941 


6,200 


1,075 


6,665 


2,093 


31.40 


1942 


6,600 


1,150 


7,590 


3,211 


42.30 


1943 


8,500 


1,225 


10,412 


5,102 


49.00 


1944 


12,000 


1 ,390 


16,680 


8,157 


48.90 


1945 


13,000 


1,500 


19,500 


7,568 


38.30 


1946 


9,800 


1,475 


14,455 


5,999 


41.50 


1947 


9,600 


1,560 


14,976 


6,335 


42.30 


1948 


10,300 


1,680 


17,304 


8,012 


46.30 


1949 


10,800 


1,440 


15,552 


6,750 


43.40 


1950 


10,500 


1,700 


17,850 


9,175 


51.40 


1951 


12,200 


1,750 


21,350 


1 1,572 


54.20 


1952 


12,000 


1,680 


20,160 


9,818 


48.70 


1953 


11,400 


1,800 


20,520 


11,019 


53.70 


1954 


12,700 


1,920 


24,384 


12,680 


52.00 


1955 


9,800 


1,900 


18,620 


10,651 


57.20 


1956 


9,400 


1,850 


17,390 


10,747 


61.80 


1957 


9,600 


1,975 


18,960 


11,073 


58.40 


1958 


9,300 


2,000 


18,600 


11,978 


64.40 


1959 


9,800 


2,060 


20,188 


11,426 


56.60 


1960 


9,500 


1,940 


18,430 


12,016 


65.20 


1961 


10,400 


2,090 


21,736 


14,346 


66.00 


1962 


11,000 


2,185 


24,035 


14,421 


60.00 


1963 


11,000 


2,285 


25,135 


13,573 


54.00 


1964 


9,700 


2,165 


21,000 


12,054 


57.40 


1965 


8,900 


2,030 


18,067 


12,159 


67.30 


1966 


7,900 


2,320 


18,328 


12,371 


67.50 


1967 


7,800 


2,010 


15,678 


11,037 


70.40 


1968 


7,900 


2,385 


18,842 


13,868 


73.60 


1969 


7,900 


2,570 


20,303 


13,928 


68.60 


1970 


7,300 


2,545 


18,579 


13,544 


72.90 


1971** 


7,000 


2,070 


14,500 


11,500 


79.80 



*Source: N. C. and USDA Crop Reporting Service. 
**Preliminary for 1971. 



24 



North Carolina Flue-Cured Crops 
1919- 1971- 







Yield Per 








Year 


No. Acres 


Acre 


Production 


Value 


Average 






(Pounds) 


(1,000 lbs.) 


(1,000 Dollars) 


Price 


1919 


521,000 


612 


319,276 


$157,340 


$49.30 


1920 


621,900 


681 


423,703 


88,271 


20.80 


1921 


414,900 


594 


246,540 


60,402 


24.50 


1922 


444,000 


611 


271,170 


74,572 


27.50 


1923 


544,300 


728 


396,354 


81,998 


20.70 


1924 


473,500 


585 


276,819 


62,597 


22.60 


1925 


536,200 


696 


373,352 


83,756 


22.40 


1926 


546,700 


692 


378,274 


96,762 


25.60 


1927 


639,600 


755 


482,982 


100,414 


20.80 


1928 


712,400 


692 


493,132 


93,450 


19.00 


1929 


729,300 


665 


484,630 


89,470 


18.50 


1930 


768,000 


757 


581,200 


74,733 


12.90 


1931 


688,500 


692 


476,382 


42,024 


8.80 


1932 


462,500 


624 


288,750 


34,949 


12.10 


1933 


667,800 


794 


530,133 


85,530 


16.10 


1934 


486,500 


847 


412,055 


1 17,999 


28.60 


1935 


612,500 


635 


572,625 


1 16,418 


20.30 


1936 


591,000 


765 


451,975 


101,856 


22.50 


1937 


675,000 


883 


595,815 


143,058 


24.00 


1938 


603,500 


844 


509,470 


1 15,428 


22.70 


1939 


843,000 


964 


812,540 


123,893 


15.20 


1940 


498,000 


1,038 


516,835 


85,792 


16.60 


1941 


488,000 


928 


452,825 


132,291 


29.20 


1942 


539,000 


1,052 


566,810 


221,538 


39.10 


1943 


580,000 


935 


542,200 


219,074 


40.40 


1944 


684,000 


1,077 


736,990 


317,628 


43.10 


1945 


722,000 


1,100 


794,310 


349,148 


44.00 


1946 


802,000 


1,138 


912,970 


451,639 


49.50 


1947 


783,000 


1,139 


892,205 


374,513 


42.00 


1948 


594,000 


1,239 


739,380 


368,040 


49.80 


1949 


621,000 


1,178 


731,530 


352,508 


48.20 


1950 


640,000 


1,441 


858,140 


477,508 


55.60 


1951 


735,000 


1,331 


978,375 


523,358 


53.50 


1952 


735,000 


1,222 


898,090 


448,582 


49.90 


1953 


674,000 


1,235 


832,305 


447,076 


53.70 


1954 


686,000 


1,204 


889,490 


483,003 


54.30 


1955 


653,000 


1,499 


978,775 


520,845 


53.20 


1956 


579,000 


1,661 


961,495 


496,324 


51.60 


1957 


443,000 


1,469 


650,780 


358,442 


55.10 


1958 


429,000 


1,718 


736,855 


427,307 


58.00 


1959 


458,500 


1,533 


702,942 


407,055 


57.90 


1960 


457,500 


1,836 


839,870 


512,731 


61.10 


1961 


463,000 


1,797 


832,215 


541,468 


65.10 


1962 


483,000 


1,890 


912,810 


549,594 


60.20 


1963 


460,500 


1,999 


920,660 


535,622 


58.18 


1964 


416,000 


2,282 


949,450 


549,875 


57.90 


1965 


375,000 


1,840 


690,050 


442,796 


64.20 


1966 


409,500 


1,859 


761,360 


506,605 


66.50 


1967 


395,400 


2,071 


818,997 


523,809 


64.00 


1968 


350,500 


1,850 


648,533 


430,613 


66.45 


1969 


378,500 


1,838 


695,665 


502,305 


72.20 


1970 


383,800 


2,076 


796,941 


571,211 


71.70 


1971** 


339,000 


2,102 


712,690 


552,278 


77.50 



* Source: N. C. and USDA Crop Reporting Service. 
"Preliminary for 1971. 
Note: Since 1965, production is pounds produced and does not reflect pounds not 
sold or pounds carried forward to the next season. 

25 



North Carolina Tobacco Warehouses and Operators 
By Belts and Markets — 1971 

BORDER BELT 

Chadbourn (one set buyers) 

Jimmy Green Whse. — Jimmy Green 
Producers — Jack W. Garrett, Crickett Garrett 



Clarkton (one set buyers) 

New Clarkton — Maynard Talley, Cecil Hartley 
Bright Leaf — Jimmy Green 

Fair Bluff (one set buyers) 

Powell - B. A. Powell, Albert H. Powell ~ 

Planters — Randolph Currin, B. W. Currin, C. W. Shaw, S. Lawrence, H. E. 
and H. B. Dunn 



Fairmont (four sets buyers) 

Big Brick-Carolina — A. W. AAcDaniel, A. D. Lewis, Jr. 

Liberty-Twin States — Lynn Floyd, Hoke Smith, Jr., Clarence Joyce Estate 

Holliday-Frye - E. H. Frye, J. W. and J. AA. Holliday 

Square Deal — W. G. Bassett, C. L. Smith 

Planters-Mitchell — Harry Mitchell, Morris Daniel 

Fayetteville (one set buyers) 

Big Farmers — P. L. Campbell, A. R. Talley, Jr., Dan Talley 
Planters — J. C. Adams, Billy Adams, Jimmy Adams 



Lumberton (three sets buyers) 

Carolina — J. L. Townsend, Sr. & Jr., J. E. Johnson, Jr., Sam Dunn 
Smith-Dixie — Cecil Thompson, Jack Pait 
Hedgpeth — E. H. Collins, Albert Thornton, Jr. 
Liberty — H. D. Goode, R. H. Livermore, Frank White 
Star — D. T. Stephenson, Hogan Teater, Russell Teater 
Cooperative — C. E. McLaurin, Mgr. 



Tabor City (one set buyers) 

R. C. Coleman Co. — R. C. Coleman, Sr., Mrs. Harriet Sikes 
Planters — Don Watson, Mgr. 



Whiteville (three sets buyers) 

Gray & Neal - A. Dial Gray, J. L. Neal 

Crutchfield - G. E. & R. W. Crutchfield 

Lea's Big Dixie — William Townes Lea, Louie Love 

Liberty — J. W. Hooks, C. B. Barefoot, R. A. Barefoot, Mrs. Molly Barefoot 

Moore's — C. C. Mason, C. F. Jeffcoat 

Nelson's — Jim Smith, Lennox Long, Milton Gore 

Planters — A. O. King, Jr., Cliff Stephens 

Smith's — Ernest Smith, Joe T. Smith 

26 



EASTERN BELT 

Ahoskie (one set buyers) 

Basnight No. 1-2-3 - L. L. Wilkins, Sr. & Jr., H. G. Veazey, H. Jenkins 
Farmers 1 & 2 — W. AA. Odoms, S. S. Pierce, J. L. Morris 

Clinton (one set buyers) 

Carolina — L. D. Herring, C. J. Strickland, N. L. Daughtry, L. D. Starling, 

J. P. Gore, Mrs. M. L. Bethune 
Ross — Clarence Kirven, Jr., W. K. Beech 

Dunn (one set buyers) 

Lee's Planters, Inc. — Leiand Lee 

Big Four Whse. — Jack Calhoun, John Calhoun, Cleo Jones 

Farmville (two sets buyers) 

Bell's - R. A. Bell & Bros. 

Fountain & Monk No. 1 — John F. Fountain, J. I. Oakley, Robert Pierce 
Fountain & Monk No. 2 — John F. Fountain, J. I. Oakley, Robert Pierce 
Planters & Prewitts — Chester Worthington, W. O. Newell, B. S. Correll 
Lee's — Gordon Lee 

Goldsboro (one set buyers) 

Carolina — Guy Best, D. M. Price 

Farnners — Rudy Hill 

Big Brick — J. R. Musgrave, Sr. & Jr., Helen Musgrave 

Victory — Richard Gray 

Greenville (five sets buyers) 

Cannon's — W. T. Cannon, Carlton Dai! 

Farmers — W. Arthur Tripp, T. P. Thompson, Harold Watson, Jack Warren 

Star-Planters — B. B. Sugg, Harding Sugg 

Keel — J. A. Worthington, J. B. Worthington, Fenner Allen 

New Independent — T. W. Pruitt, W. A. Pruitt, James Belcher, W. E. 

Pruitt 
Raynor-Forbes-Clark — Noah Raynor, A. A. Forbes, Billy Clark 
New Carolina — Laddie Avery, Larry Hudson 

Kinston (four sets buyers) 

Knott's 1 & 2 — Graham Knott, Billy Brewer 

Farmers-New Dixie — John Jenkins, Sr. & Jr., Lee Jenkins 

New Central — W. I. Herring, Bill King 

H & H — Dempsey Hodges, Virgil Harper 

Banner — John Heath, Kirby Loftin 

Brooks — Roger Brooks, Fred Brooks 

Central — W. I. Herring, Bill King 

Robersonville (one set buyers) 

Grays-Red Front-Central — J. H. Gray, Jack Sharp, James E. Gray 
Hardee Whse., Inc. — Norman Hardee, Edwin Lee 

Rocky Mount (four sets buyers) 

Cobb & Carlton - W. E. Cobb, Jr., J. C. Carlton 
Mangum, Inc. — W. H. Phipps, General Mgr. 

27 



Planters — S. S. Edmondson 

Smith's — James D. Smith, Sr. & Jr. 

Works - R. J. Works, Jr., A. B. Raynor 

Peoples — Guy Barnes, Gene Simmons, James Walker 

Farmers — J. Holt Evans, Joe W. Coleman 

Fenners — J. B. Fenner 

Smithfield (two sets buyers) 

Farmers — N. Leo Daughtry, Bill Kennedy 

Planters-Riverside — Joe Stephenson, Jerry Stephenson, Gilbert Stephenson 

Gold Leaf - R. A. Pearce, Sr. & Jr. 

Wallace — Lav^rence Wallace, Bobby Wallace, Larry Wallace 

Tarboro (one set buyers) 

Clark 1 & 2 — J. F. Wilson, Jr., George L. Proctor 
Farmers No. 1 — Walter Walker, W. G. Maples, Fred L. Walston 
Farmers No. 2 - Walter Walker, W. G. Maples, Fred L. Walston 
Victory — W. V. Leggett, C. H. Leggett 

Wallace (one set buyers) 

Blanchard & Farrior - O. C. Blanchard, Sr. & Jr., W. H. Farrior, R. H. 

Lanier 
Hussey — Joe Bryant 

Sheffield's — John Sheffield, Homer M. Boney, Jr. 
Farmers — H. G. Perry 

Washington (one set buyers) 

Sermon's — W. J. Sermon, Harry L. Roberts 
Talley - W. G. Talley, T. J. Talley 
Hassell — Malcolm P. Hassell 

Wendell (one set buyers) 

Liberty-Farmers — H. H. Eddins, Berdon Eddins 
Northside — Graham Dean, Bill Sanders 
Banner — C. P. (Pete) Southerland 

Williamston (one set buyers) 

Rogers — Urbin Rogers, Leiand Barnhill, Rossell Rogers 
New Dixie — C. Fisher Harris, J. Elmo Lilley 

Wilson (five sets buyers) 

Big Dixie — W. C. Thompson, Buck Edmondson 

Wainwright — George L. Wainwright, Sr. & Jr. 

Centre Brick - S. M. Cozart, W. H. Cozart III, F. M. Eagles 

Growers Cooperative — Clifford Aycock, Mgr. 

Bob's & Clark's — C. R. Clark, Jesse Harris 

Liberty — W. Proctor Scarboro, Harold W. Lancaster 

Nichols & Scott — A. B. Nichols, Clay Scott 

Smith-Planters — S. Grady Deans, John F. Deans 

Windsor (one set buyers) 

Planters No. 1 & 2 - C. B. Griffin, B. U. Griffin, Dave Newsome 
Farmers — Bill Davis, Norman Swain 

28 



MIDDLE BELT 

Aberdeen (one set buyers) 

New Aberdeen — Cecil Moore, J. T. Worthington, Bobby Oldham 
Planters — W. Fentriss Phillips 
Hardee's — Hugh T. Hardee 

Carthage (one set buyers) 

AAcConnells — E. C. Layton, Earl J. Ennis, George W. AAabe 
Victory — E. C. Layton, Earl J. Ennis 
New Farmers — Bill Carter, Sr. & Jr. 

Durham (three sets buyers) 

Liberty - Walker Stone, Sr. & Jr., K. O. Bishop 
Roycroft-AAangum — J. K. Roycroft, Randolph Currin 
Star-Brick 1 & 2 - W. W. Cozart, W. L. Currin, A. L. Carver 
Farmers-Planters — J. M. Talley, Bob Dale, Sam Mangum 

Ellerbe (one set buyers) 

Farmers — J. D. Perkins, Cecil AAoore, Bobby Oldham, Jimmy Tilley 
Richmond County — Ashton Richardson, R. P. Brim, Jr. 

Fuquay-Varina (two sets buyers) 

New Deal — Dan Talley, Dan Brisson 
Gold Leaf - J. W. Dale 
Carolina — E. E. Clayton, Larry C. Knott 
Roberts — Joe Roberts 

Henderson (two sets buyers) 

Moore's Big Banner — A. H. Moore, C. E. Jeffcoat, B. W. Young 

Carolina — J. S. Royster, I. J. Jackson 

Farmers — W. J. Alston, Jr. 

High Price — C. B. Turner, R. E. Tanner, R. E. Fleming, S. P. Fleming, 

J. K. Parks, M. D. Abbott 
Liberty 1 & 2 — George T. Robertson, S. E. Southerland, John Wilson 
Ellington — F. H. Ellington, John Ellington 
Alston's — W. J. Alston, Jr. 
Big Dollar - M. L. Hight, James H. O'Brien 

Louisburg (one set buyers) 

Big Franklin - S. T. Cottrell, H. B. Cottrell 

Ford's — Charlie Ford 

Star — James Speed, Gus McGhee, Clemmon Pearce 

Oxford (two sets buyers) 

Banner-Mitchell — David Mitchell 

Fleming — F. O. Finch, D. T. Currin, Jr. 

Johnson-High Price - C. R. Watkins, Sr. & Jr., T. J. Currin, J. C. Hamme 

Owen 1 & 2 - W. L. Gregory, M. A. Goode, Sam W. Watkins, John S. 

Watkins, Jr., C. B. Wilkins 
Yeargin-Granville — R. W. Crews, W. W. Yeargin 

Sanford (one set buyers) 

Twin City — W. M. Carter, T. W. Mansfield 
Morgan's — Jimmy Morgan 

Warrenton (one set buyers) 

Boyd's — B. W. Currin, Jr. 

Centre — M. P. Carroll, E. W. Radford, E. M. Moody 

Farmers — E. G. Tarwater 

Thompson — C. E. Thompson, M. P. Edwards, Jr. 

Currin's 1 & 2 — C. W. Currin, D. G. Currin, Jr., David Tillotson 

29 



OLD BELT 

Burlington (one set buyers) 

Carolina — H. L. Perkins 

Coble — N. C. Newman, Joe Robertson 

Farnners — Bill AAcCauley, Glenn AAcCray 

Greensboro (one set buyers) 

Greensboro Tobacco Whse. Co. — R. C. Coleman, Jr., AAgr. 

Guilford Tobacco Whse. - J. R. Pell, J. E. Pell, H. P. Smothers, Jr. 

Madison (one set buyers) 

New Brick — S. F. Webster, Lloyd Webster 
Carolina — S. F. Webster, Lee AAcCollum 

Sharpe & Smith Farmers — W. S. Smith, George Denham, Jr., F. S. 
Williams, S. H. Price, Jr. 

Mebane (one set buyers) 

Farmers — Jule Allen, Bill Allen 

Piedmont — Billy Hopkins, Jimmy Hopkins 

Mt. Airy (one set buyers) 

Dixie — Tom Jones, Boyd Cain, F. V. Dearmin, Jr., W. H. Brown, H. Y. 

Hodges, Fred E. Chilton 
New Farmers — Tom Jones, Boyd Cain, F. V. Dearmin, Jr., W. H. Brown, 

H. Y. Hodges, Fred E. Chilton 
Hunters — J. W. Hunter 

Reidsville (one set buyers) 

New Farmers — G. E. Smith, Steve Smith, P. D. AAcAAichael, Phillip Carter 
Smothers-Watts-Leader — A. P. Sands, Tom Kimbro, T. Garland Smothers 

Roxboro (one set buyers) 

Farmers — Lindsay Wagstaff, R. A. Hester, Larry C. Hester 

Hyco — F. J. Hester, Jr. 

Foacre — H. W. Winstead, Jr., Pres. 

Planters Whse. - T. O. Pass, Sr. & Jr. 

Growers 1 & 2 — Elmo Mitchell, Roy Carver 

Stoneville (one set buyers) 

Joyce's — O. P. Joyce, W. R. Joyce 

Farmers-Piedmont — R. N. Linville, Clarence Peeples, W. Q. Chilton, 
Robert Rakestraw, Garland Rakestraw 

Winston-Salem (four sets buyers) 

Carolina-Star — R. W. Newsome, W. B. Simpson, H. AA. Bouldin 

Growers — Joe Pell, C. R. Harris, R. J. Harris, P. R. Floyd, J. T. Harris 

Peppers — C. F. Hutchins, Joe Cook, Homer Dearmin 

Taylor — L. E. Pope 

Big Winston — Taylor Carter, Jack Carter 

Cook's — B. E. Cook, Claude Strickland, Jr., P. Thomas, Doug Cook 

Planters — Paul Draughn, Roger L. Nichols, F. Smithdeal 

Yadkinville (one set buyers) 

Northwest N. C. Farmers Whse. — R. A. Owen, Sherman Todd 

Big Yadkin Tobacco Whse., Inc. — E. H. Barnard, Ralph T. White, Chris 

Rosser 
Millers Tobacco Whse. Co. - J. A. Miller, Sr. & Jr., J. W. Flinchum, C. M. 

Pate 

30 



BURLEY BELT 

Asheville (two sets buyers) 

Dixie-Burley — R. A. Owen 
Planters — J. W. Stewart 
Day's — Charlie Day 

Boone (one set buyers) 

Mountain Buriey — Joe E. Coleman 

West Jefferson (one set buyers) 

Tri-State Buriey — Rex Taylor 
Farmers Buriey — Mrs. Tom Faulkner 



STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE 

James A. Graham, Commissioner, 

Ex-Officio Chairman 

J. Atwell Alexander Stony Point 

Fred N. Colvard Jefferson 

Guy E. Fisher Pendleton 

Claude T. Hall Roxboro 

George P. Kittrell Corapeake 

Charles F. Phillips Thomasville 

J. H. Poole West End 

Henry Gray Shelton Speed 

James L. Sutherland Laurinburg 

David Townsend, Jr Rowland 



31 



DOMESTIC TAX PAID CIGARETTE CONSUMPTION 
BY KINDS — 1971 




Total Domestic Consumption 
538 Billion Cigarettes